Construction Worker Rescued After Being Buried Up To The Waist In Concrete

On November 6th, a construction worker was on the job at the 1 Channel Center project in South Boston when a form wall collapsed on top of him. The collapse caused the man's foot to get trapped underneath the debris and, by the time emergency personnel arrived, he was buried up to his waist in concrete. EMS crews began treating the man while firefighters were digging him out, as it took crews about an hour and a half to stabilize the load of concrete, and dirt that was pressing up against wall, in order to safely remove the construction worker from the debris. The Boston District 6 Fire Chief stated that the man's injuries appeared to be relatively minor, other than a possible broken ankle.

Even when safety precautions are in place, construction sites can be extremely dangerous. In fact, construction sites are second most dangerous industry behind the fishing industry. Many times construction accidents happen when safety procedures are not followed, when short cuts are taken in an attempt to cut costs, when untrained or unskilled workers are on the job, and more.

That is why you need an experienced Quincy construction accident attorney who is not afraid to go up against construction companies and their insurance agencies. When you contact my firm, I will be able to answer any questions you may have, discuss the options available to you, advice you on how to proceed, and provide you with the aggressive representation you need when seeking compensation for the injuries you sustained in your construction accident.

If you or a loved one has been seriously injured in a construction accident, get in touch with our Quincy personal injury attorney at Flanagan & Associates today.

Categories: Personal Injury
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